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and eastern europe. warsaw, berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest and yugoslavia. all these famous cities and the populations around them. c-span: why did you want to write about it? >> guest: i was in the way inspired by my first book. in no way one in of my first books that my previous book which was about the gulag system. it represents a continuation of the -- -- that i had after writing the book. one of the things i got interested about was why people went along with it and why did people go along with totalitarian regimes? what is the institutional pressure, why did camp guards do what they were told to do? why does it happen? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii because it's a time when the soviet union was then had reached a kind of height. there was a sort of -- of stalinism and stalinism was created throughouthroughou t the 1920s and 30s and then it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with a clinical theory and an economic theory and a clear ideology. it was exactly at this moment wh
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting the links. this is a photo from last year. what we don't know what was said teen them this year
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
. the budget deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform a
factors going on here too. europe and are drowning in debt. china has a near $3 trillion reserve surplus. you've got demographics. europe and america are aging rapidly. in europe the population is shrinking. there is no such demographic problem in china. you add it all together, debt, demographics and growth rate china is indeed on course to become number one fairly soon. gregg, hold on a second. there is a danger in just extrapolating out from current trends. what's in place will go on forever. we did that with japan 30 years ago. got that one wrong. maybe we shouldn't be extrapolating like this with china. gregg: the other thing that is very conspicuous here is the enormous trade imbalance with china. our trade deficit with china has tripled over the last 10 years. point of fact i just looked it up today. we export 7%. they export 23% to the united states. isn't that a job killer for americans? >> yes it is. there is no question about it. many of the jobs which our fathers and grandfathers had in the united states left a generation ago or 10 years ago, they left for china and that's ba
the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor frank keating. next on the panel, we have the institute fellow and the r
because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a further step. again if it happens, it could be another step in building pressure on china to enforce the u.n. security council sanctions on north korea and in fact to team up with the rest of the world to try to apply stronger sanctions and more effective sanctions on north korea. jon: kim jong-un and his father indicated, they proved time and time again they were more interested in having ballistic missiles and that kind of technology than they were in seeing their people fed. are you convinced that there is a way to impose
at a meeting of the organization for security and cooperation in europe, known as the ocof sce, and margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret. >> reporter: well, scott, officials familiar with those talks say the russians now think that bashar al-assad may not survive the war and they want to have influence in syria if his regime falls, or if he loses control of the chemical weapons inside of his country. u.s. officials are particularly concerned that those weapons could fall into the hands of an al qaeda affiliate active within syria. >> pelley: so what's coming next? >> reporter: well, it's a start to a new round of diplomacy. the russians have refused to meet for months, but this is not a breakthrough. the russians are signaling they're willing to help with the political transition, but they are still officially supporting assad. secretary clinton says the russians have refused to give him asylum. other countries have offered but so far he is not negotiating his exit. assad has vowed to fight to the death. >> pelley: margaret, thank you. when the syrian people first rose up it
while high while illegal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> a reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> reporter: marijuana advocates argue marijuana is less debilitating than alcohol. but a new study shows those who drive within 3 hours of smoking pot are at a greater risk of causing a crash. >> it inhibits the ability to jump the judge time and distance. >> reporter: in state where marijuana is legal, the level is 5 man or grams. the impairment some argue is equal to alcohol. >> it's difficult to determine whether that five nanograms will change. >> reporter: heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> two dosages would give me 5 nanograms. it's impossible to make that determination. >> reporter: the bottom line is this is going to be litigated. the pot people want it at 10 nanograms and it's at 5. megyn: coming up. how does amer
as well. talking about the banking giant hsbc, europe's largest, have to pay $2 billion to settle investigation by u.s. prosecutors who are looking into international drug money laundering. investigators say the bank ignored rules that could have stopped this laundering operation, that the money went to drug cartels and terrorists. jim bolden is joining us london. what happened? >> reporter: well, suzanne, this is interesting. all of these banks have been fined by the u.s. government over last few years but hsbc, by far, the biggest. this fine, as you say, $1.9 billion. the government says that this bank has not been complying with u.s. laws when it comes to finding out where the money is going to, where the money's come from. u.s. government says there s too much money coming from mexico for hsbc not to know between 2006 and 2009, that it must have been coming from money laundering from drug cartels. they say they have put now measures in place so it wouldn't happen again. >> why are we seeing problems with or european banks as well? huge international fine -- these fines on inte
, certain parts of asia at times. there was in fact a bias, if you will, towards europe and particularly western europe over a number of years. but in the 1960's there was a decision made in this country by way of our laws that moved us towards a worldwide quota system. meaning that the chances for peoples around the world were to be in some ways viewed as equal. meaning that we did not have a bias toward europe, we did not have a bias toward some other part of the world. the idea was that we would try and make our immigration policy work such that someone who wished to come to the united states from a country in africa or a country in asia would have a similar chance as existed for someone in europe. so that was a major change in our overall policy. when i came to congress in 1979 that was essentially where we were. but we also realized that there had been a lack of enforcement of the laws with respect to legal immigration, such that we had a significant number of people who would come to the united states without the benefit of papers or who had come into this country illegally or had
hours flight away from europe. jenna: why would we get involved there in northern mali and not get involved in other spots like syria for example, or in places like yemen where we hear there is a hotbed for terrorists at well? >> well i think part of the reason is that mali for many years a poster child of democracy and alleged stability in this region. it's a very crucial region of the just to the south of it is sub-saharan after can where we derive a great deal of our energy imports. places like nigeria and other places are very sensitive. just to the north this is libya which is still very, very unsettled. algeria which is yet to face the arab spring and reform. and north africa and egypt. this is a very critical region on the boarders of several areas that are very sensitive right now. jenna: what are the islamists doing in that area right now? >> well they're imposing their harsh brand of rule. they have destroyed a number of world heritage sites. islamic monuments ironically enough. they're imposing brutal punishments upon the people. more importantly from the security side t
coming from eastern europe and has the project blitz free is being led by a mysterious russian attacker and many targeted may not even realize it. >> you're someone with a substantial amount of money in your account. you logon one day and have a smaller amount than before but you've been hacked. that could happen to thousands of americans this coming spring. a new report says some of america's biggest banks, 30 of them, are at risk of a master cyber attack that could siphon millions of dollars from unsuspecting customers. >> we've found to date 3 and 500 devices that have been infected within the u.s. pat calhoon mcafee won't name the individual bank but account holders in many of the large mainstream banks are targeted. mcafee says this attack is from a cyber gag with a handle. >> he's trying to build attackers to expand the scope of the project. so that's the first thing. but how it's actually executed in the project itself is that he has computers that are basically monitoring and controlling all of these infected devices. >> calhoon says the attackers are going after individuals who
cliff and a slowdown in the world's economy and in asia and in europe. so these are the three factors that have come together to give us a sustained drop in the price of gasoline almost over the last three weeks, wolf. >> is this a short-term development? what's in store over the longer term? >> we're into that lower driving season. obviously, spring and summer are bigger driving seasons. you'll see a pickup in demand when we get back into spring. that typically happens. a lot of it depends on the price of oil. that depends on what happens in the world economy. there are two things happening. one is the fiscal cliff. and the recession in europe. if things continue to slow down economically, we'll see less demand for gasoline. if there's more tension in the middle east, we'll see higher prices for oil. those are two things that could affect the price of oil, which will affect the price of gasoline. one thing to remember, that over the last ten years or so, wolf, demand for gasoline has started to drop off, as cars have become more efficient and as we've become better conservers. you'll
europe and asia in terms of our -- in terms of our national natural gas. but it creates a better economy, high revenues that reduces the debt. >> senator, the same question to you. i'm wondering, this headline recently predicting that we're going to be -- the united states could be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. i mean, this is something almost unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government from here on out, given that? >> i think the role of the federal government is to do things that encourage exactly that result and to follow up a little bit on the question of fiscal cliff, part of the way that you saw this fiscal problem issue grow our relative position in the economy relative to everybody else's. one of our big problems right now is the percentage of government spending is way more than it should be relative to total g.d.p. and part of that is because you don't have the growth in g.d.p. that the right kind of energy policies would produce. if there's an easier formula ever in the history of economics than more american energy equals more
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more this functional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson- bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of
overnight in asia, europe is following suit this morning, as fear dominates wall street. now the focus turns to the fed, and investors are hoping for some good news later today, after suffering the worst day in two years. >> credit rating agency basically said, we no longer have faith in you, the united states government, because we no longer believe your political system is capable of basic competence. the basic competence necessary to pay your bills. that republican-made, self-inflicted crisis and the resolution to it created this current man-made self-inflicted crisis that we're in right now. one we're lamely calling the fiscal cliff. the way republicans in congress and the president solved the debt ceiling crisis was to build this cliff, that we're now supposedly dangling off of. they inve' we're up against. the debt ceiling fight was a disaster, and now republicans, surprise, want to have that fight again. "the new york times" reports that one idea bouncing around the right side of the aisle is this. the republicans will extend tax cuts for the middle class, and then when they need to r
for europe. >> last night's decision on the single supervisory mechanism for euro area banks is a breakthrough towards a true banking union, which is significant and crucial in order to restore and reinforce confidence in the european economy. >> sreenivasan: the banking superviser role must be approved by the european parliament, but the position could be up and running by march of next year. separately, finance ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly
important if you live in europe as i do. actually, the idea of taking 50 million people out of poverty over the next ten years if that's possible, wow, after the stuff we have done on aides as malaria. that's the reason to get out of bed, mr. president. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of
centuries ago when europe was coming out of the dark ages. it was a period of humanism when the world-- and, in particular, the catholic church-- was open to new ideas in philosophy, science and individual liberty; a celebration of the human spirit. it's the pope's library, but it contains much more than church documents-- manuscripts going back nearly 2,000 on music, math and exploration; even cookbooks and love letters. a place for scholars only, but a place we can only hope can inspire an end to barbarism. welcome to the 15th century. in rome, turn a corner and you bump into antiquity, a delicious mixed salad of present and past. we arrived at the vatican to find a medieval costume parade in progress. what better way to begin a trek through history? >> timothy janz: there's about two million printed books. >> safer: two million printed books. and inside the library, the past surrounded us again, as we were shown the magnificent building and its riches. >> janz: this is the urbino bible. >> safer: for instance, this spectacular bible, commissioned in 1476 by the duke of urbino... >> janz:
the fiscal cliff will impact europe and vice versa. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. we create easy-to-use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! we knew you needed a platform that could really help you elevate your trading. so we built it. chances of making this? it's a lot easier to find out if a trade is potentially profitable. just use our trade & probability calculator and there it is. for all the reasons you trade options - from income to risk management to diversification - you'll have the tools to get it done. strategies. chains. po
of palestinian state. leaders in the u.s., australia, and europe say this plan could kill any chance of a two-state solution. our frederick plankin actually visited the construction zone. >> reporter: these barren hills outside jerusalem are the center of the international uproar. the area is called e1 in the west bank where israel says it's planning to construct a settlement neighborhood. the land is already developed with power lines, roads, and a functioning police station. a few miles away in the palestinian town people say the new settlement construction would be catastrophic. this taxi driver believes it would make it almost impossible for him to get to many towns in the west bank. if they build this settlement and close off our roads, it will mean that my trip from hebron to jericho will take between five hours and a whole day, he says. the construction here would essentially be an expansion of one of the largest israeli settlements in the west bank. israel announced the construction of some 3,000 homes in the west bank and east jerusalem as a punitive measure after palestinians won a
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
and the united states out of europe, i would imagine. megyn: i'm sorry to be obtuse. but when you say battery what do you mean? >> it's a missile battery. the element that fires the missiles and they have a command and control facility that guides the missile to the target and it's a fire control mechanism. so that's what we have got here. they will come out of three countries, germany, the netherland and the united states probably based out of urine. largely defensive. the turks are spooked about it activity surrounding the chemical weapons and the fact that the last year they have been dealing with rocket mortar attacks from syria and occasional air attack on their border. while some people will think they are overreacting and imposing article 5 of nato which every country has to commit itself to defend another member if they believe they are in peril. you can understand the turk's position given what's gone on the last year or so. megyn: are we send troops over there or sending people to deliver the batteries. >> i think we'll send some batteries ourselves as i understand. i'm fairly confi
to blow up the country with the next amount of nukes. >> and we still have massive armies in europe protecting them from a massive soviet union. >> yeah. >> korea is another issue -- we do need people there. >> stephanie: right, but he points out who is behind all of this fiscal cliff cage rattling. the rich and their friends. any changes on the low, low, low capital gains tax. so will congress pass a bill? in a pig's eye. what is much more likely is to kick the can down the road and let the next congress figure it out. here is another idea let's join hands and walk to the bottom of the cliff together it is not very far down. america will go back to tax rates that work better than the cuts we have been living with. congress will be forced to do something for a change. republicans and democrats will have to work object to to repair rather than filibustering talking points perhaps america is on the cliff of a fiscal opportunity. [ bell chimes ] [ applause ] >> stephanie: there you go. >> george bush's first inaugural address. we got yawl a surplus. that means you are p
's europe, and they're blaming the fact that their economies aren't going based on the fact that we're in this stalemate. you know, it's huge. >> harold, i mean, it all comes down to leadership. you know, when you talk to business owners, they want leadership shown. i'm glad the president is talking to business leaders now. >> and a debater on the phone. >> not only the administration but also on the other side of pennsylvania avenue with the republicans and harry reid in the senate. you're just not seeing it. >> you don't see enough of it. curiously, the markets -- investors are actually increasing their exposure which is kind of contrarian to your point. i do believe to julia's point, you'll see a receding or retreat in that attitude over the next several days and few week ifs we can't get ourselves closer. i remain optimistic. the president wants a legacy and his legacy depends on this. and two proposals have been put forth. they resemble each other in terms of the amount they've asked for. i give republicans credit. they understand revenue has to be part of the deal. the questio
, with the nazis invading poland and europe going into war, the americans could see war coming but it wasn't until we were literally stabbed by the japanese that morning that the anger and everything came out and people just, it galvanized the nation and changed america forever. martha: my mom told me a story about being a little girl and sitting down for, i think it was hot chocolate or something at a diner with her mother. suddenly you could feel all across the place something was very wrong. her mom grabbed her by the arm, and they went straight home. that realization that that safety, that that feeling of domestic security, that you enjoyed, and i think you're so right. i think for so many people today 9/11 had that same sort of really life altering impact. and as we have said, they will be remembering this event today at pearl harbor. they will be honoring a man, captain nash, ray emory, who is 91 years old and has spent the better part of the last 21 years in an effort annoyed some people involved with the remembrances of pearl harbor. he has been dogged in identifying more of the remains th
there reminds us that europe still faces a lot of hurdles before it comes out of its economic crisis. countries like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money by selling off assets including the aircraft leasing unit that complemented aig's airplane insurance business. if u.s. regulators apro s appro deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors.
to prevent the kind of crisis here that we have seen unfolding all across europe. republicans have engaged in these discussions in good faith. we have agreed to make tough choices. the question is where's the president? where is the president? where's the only man in the country who can make it happen? well, it appears that with just a couple of weeks left to resolve this crisis, he is busy moving the goal post. instead of leading as he was elected to do, he's out campaigning and playing games with the nation's future. so my sincere plea this morning is that the president gets serious, that he put the campaign behind him and lead. if he does, he will have willing partners. the first sign is seriousness, seriousness about spending cuts. now, madam president, on an entirely different matter, yesterday i began the difficult task of saying an early goodbye to now six members of our conference who will be leaving the senate at the end of the year, and this morning i'd like to say a few words about my friend and long-time colleague, senator snowe. she has devoted the last 40 years of her life to
in this country because i think we are getting a real break because europe is having the problems they are having and, as a result, the world has excess savings and are doing the investment and do not have a great choice. they look at us and say, we are better. when we get downgraded, our interest rates fell. we are living on borrowed time. why none of the reason why they are playing political games when there is such a real issue -- why they are playing political games when there is such a real issue. we are self-dealing in our own debt. purges in over 70% of all new u.s. debt issuance fees. -- issuances. if you look at people who are buying our debt, their appetite is getting less, not greater. they are buying short-term debt because of huge interest rates risks. if you look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be co
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. it is no longer -- they do not have much in common except for the memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, and the end of world war ii through 1956. "iron curtain," sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. former budget director peter orszag says concerns over the fiscal cliff have been overblown and the focus should shift to the debt limit increase. the global vice chairman for citigroup predicted that republicans will ultimately caved in on tax increases. this is 15 minutes. >> four protections. discuss what will the impending fiscal cliff means for tax filing season. and the formula for paying doctors under medicare. later, a look at how the u.s. population is expected to change. our guests are jennifer, a demographer for the senses, and william, a demographer for the brookings -- >> medicare costs will grow less than 3%, which is unbelievably low by historical standards. or that we saw last year. in a continuation of a value- based health-care syst
.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second and other parts of the world. it gives you a backdrop of a huge amount of credit availability. a big drop off in 2008 and 2009 and some very slow increases. this gives you some backdrop that the securitization markets in the united states of come back to an extent if you look at the various asset classes. there are just not as many auto loans being made right now as five years ago. generally, the markets function and they are working. not many as student loans going to the private sector since the shift. most loans going under the government's balance sheet. credit cards, there were changes that have fundamentally changed different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old from 2011 and 2012. this is the slide everybody talks about in various formats, a dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states. this is the only slide i can possibly show you where securitization volumes have gone up. it is the agent market has gone up by $300 billion over the past six years. a huge change or the private mbs, p
to the sport. when he left europe, people were not quite sure he would get up all the energy in the united states. there were less than 12 teams. now there is almost double that. what is his legacy here in the united states when it comes to soccer? >> reporter: part of it is just what you said, deb, that there are now more teams, also, soccer was sort of -- well, in the back waters sort of. the games were being played in the nfl, football, stadiums, if you look behind me the home depot center, it is a soccer only stadium, very intimate, great setting. now, there were only four stadiums in the mls that were soccer only. beckham leaves? and that number will soon swell to 15. so that is considered to be a remarkable achievement by beckham, or at least it happened during his era, granted people are saying soccer would naturally grow in the u.s. anyway. >> just say hello for me, he doesn't know who i am. >> reporter: i promise. >> okay, it is a mission, go ahead, go. >>> well, a guy walks into a maryland store for a powerball ticket, but instead of tossing it in the trash like most people who p
in europe. allen's nomination on hold because of his involvement in the sex scandal that brought down former cia director david petraeus. >>> in foreign news, new intelligence reports, indicate syria's government may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons against the rebels. in response though, the u.s. and its allies are considering military options. here's abc's martha raddatz. >> reporter: the latest intelligence is alarming. officials telling abc news the u.s. is now seeing specific signs that the syrian regime may be preparing to use the chemical sarin against opposition forces. sarn is an extremely toxic substance that can kill a person in matter of minutes with only one drop. the victim suffocated from the paralyzing effects of the toxin. this new intelligence has the obama administration so concerned, harsh warnings came from the president himself. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there w
to respond. multiple sources in the u.s., europe and the arab world tell cnn there's no indication assad is ready to leave syria. >> is he the type of person that would take asylum or will he go down fighting? >> i think there's a chance he will huddle, it's whether his sect will want to huddle with him or not. he's been a failure as a president. >> reporter: the sect he's talking about are the offshoot of shiite islam, a small minority that assad's family is a part of. if assad does leave, could he be investigated eventually captured on war crimes charges. >> ecuador, venezuela, cuba are countries where he could feel safe for the time being. he has to be concerned about a shift in the winds and any of those governments as well. and certainly no one expects the regime to continue indefinitely. >> right now, those nations leaders are more sympathetic to assad. there's another ally even closer. >> couldn't he just go to iran, is that a more feasible location? >> it's easier for him to go to iran, it's a shorter flight. in the end the islamic republic is the place where president assad and
diplomats from europe going to the syrian border, in some cases inside syria with suitcases of money to hand out to the political factions we support who can hand this out to local operatives there and you know, it is like chicago-style politics. this is more like your territory here. so imagine chicago -- >> wait a minute. >> i haven't had suitcases of money in my life. >> but if you did -- >> bill: right. >> so you see the effort to beef up the more secular forces to oppose the islamist forces that are present in the opposition. >> one thing we hear a lot from republicans is the idea that obama backed the arab spring and got involved and has made things not -- has made things worse in the middle east. do you feel like with this assad thing, will we be better off without him and having this opposition in charge instead? do you feel like it is the right thing to do? >> yes. it is the right thing to do. it is what is happening. it is not like we control this situation. this is a region that's in evolution. that's in tu
was kind of the leader. >> stephanie: i dove donnie. steve doocy. >> europe is great because they have wonderful food and runny cheeses, but we shouldn't base our policies on theirs because they are stinkers. >> we should base it on singapore where they have no unemployment, and they have a competitive market. that protects workers. >> stephanie: we should be like singapore? >> oh my god. holy crap. he is a bigger idiot than i thought. he is not even trying to hide what a douche bag he is. >> stephanie: okay. bill o'reilly. really? is this his whole december? >> there is no doubt that your day you christian tradition in this country is under attack. and people like pastor happy have not to stop. okay. enough. enough. and we need leadership not only in the pulpit but now we are going to need it in the public square. >> after of the judao christian are jewish. you moron. >> stephanie: thank you for that reference. [ applause ] >> stephanie: judao, christian. >> i'm an atheist, i don't care if you have a cross on your property -- i really don't. this whole thing is just
, so many american jobs are dependent on how the economies in europe, asia are doing that they're watching this very closely. >> absolutely. one of the things she said i found interesting, first of all as you heard, she says listen, the idea of let's have the middle class tax rates remain the same, work the rest out next year, we need a big approach here, precisely because it does effect so many other economies in the global economy. she was less bullish on the idea that greece or spain or anybody else in trouble might effect the u.s. economy. she said, you know, the problem with the u.s. is internal, and it becomes a world problem. >> what do you think about the supreme court, they're now going to consider california's proposition 8, consider same sex marriage in the united states. >> i think it raises obviously to the highest court in the land a question that has bounced around the states with different verdicts. you have had a lot of states had constitutional amendments banning same sex marriage, california said yes, then has said no. you had for the first time the past elec
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